The Health Benefits of Cannabis Extract

This is the meeting for the week of July 17, 2017 through July 23, 2017

This Meeting at a Glance:
Program: The Health Benefits of Cannabis Extracts
Program Description: In this week’s program, our guest speaker speaks to us about the health benefits of cannabis extracts.
Speaker: Laurie Light, Client Care Program Director for Octavia Wellness

Is this your first time to visit us? If so, welcome to our weekly online meeting! To complete our meeting, please continue reading from here to the bottom of this page. 

Each Monday our week’s meeting is posted early in the morning, U.S. Pacific Time. These meetings are designed so that you can read and watch what we post anytime during the week. The entire meeting takes about 60 minutes to complete, with the video conference recording of the program being the bulk of the time.

Note that you can easily read this meeting with your favorite device, so feel free to take our meeting on the go with you; read it while on public transit, waiting in line for coffee, or even at the park! Please also make sure to complete the attendance form at the bottom and leave a comment. Enjoy!


Welcome to the Rotary eClub of Silicon Valley!

Message from President Stephen

Welcome to Week 2 of our Rotary Year!

New to our meetings? Then I want to welcome you to the Rotary eClub of Silicon Valley’s online meeting! Every week we curate inspiring and educational content in an online format like the one you’re seeing here. As you continue reading, watching, and scrolling, our hope is that you’ll leave feeling a little bit more inspired. As an online Rotary club, we have these asynchronous meetings online, but we also meet in-person in the Silicon Valley / San Francisco bay area for service projects and for social events. Keep reading on, and feel free to also join us for one of our in-person events if you can make it!

Last week a few members of our club got together via video hangout in an effort to help me put together our programs committee so that our club can have a system for anyone that would love to help contribute to our meetings every week! I am very happy to say that we are almost done and are putting some final touches to our committee process. I would like everyone to please thank Mitty Chang, Andrew Taw, Rushton Hurley, Nate Gildart, Brett Sham, and Steve (Shags) Shagrin who will be on our programs committee to take on the efforts of continuing to provide excellent meeting content for which our club has grown to be known for! We will be sending out a club email with guidelines on how to become more involved with club meeting content once we have everything put together! Until then, I hope everyone enjoys the rest of their week and this weeks meeting!

Yours in service,


Stephen Zhou, President
Rotary eClub of Silicon Valley
[email protected]


Weekly Inspiration: This Man Turned a Car Into a Motorbike to Escape the Desert

Every week we start our meetings with a short video highlighting innovation, inspiration, entrepreneurship, or social change. This week we are featuring a video from Great Big Story about creativity and mechanics.

In one of his many road trips to Morocco, Emile Leray (nicknamed the “Doctor of African Mechanics” by his friends) hit a roadblock … literally. Well, actually it was a rock in the middle of the desert, but you get the idea. With his car’s front axel destroyed and a limited food supply, Leray faced an uncertain future. So what did he do? Engineered the ultimate DIY escape.

Wicked cool! If you were stranded in the desert with a broken car, what would you do?


World of Rotary

The over 1.2 million members of Rotary Clubs around the world form the largest humanitarian service organization, Rotary International. We’re part of this global family. This segment is a tribute to stories and to good deeds Rotary clubs around the world are conducting.

This week we feature an article regarding the success of Rotary’s PolioPlus strategy.

Dr. Rana Safdar, director of the National Emergency Operations Center in Pakistan, on the success of Rotary’s PolioPlus strategy:

“At a busy toll plaza in Kohat, Pakistan, a three-member vaccination team is working fast.

Outfitted in blue Rotary vests and flanked by armed military personnel, the vaccinators approach a white van as it pulls away from the scattered stream of traffic, cars rattling east toward Islamabad and west to the nearby border with Afghanistan. One worker leans toward the driver to ask a question as another reaches into a cooler to prepare the vaccine. Among the crush of passengers in the van, they identify one child who has not yet been vaccinated.

There is no time for second-guessing.

There is not even enough room for the boy to crawl toward the front of the vehicle or through one of the doors; a relative must hand the young child to the vaccinators through one of the rear windows. He is quickly inoculated with two drops of oral polio vaccine, and his pinkie finger is stained with purple ink to indicate that he’s received his dose. He cries as the vaccinator hurriedly passes him back through the window. The van speeds off, fading back into the dizzying hum of traffic, as the vaccinators look for the next car and child.

This scene plays out thousands of times a day at transit posts like this one — makeshift vaccination clinics set up at bus stops, border crossings, army posts, and police checkpoints across the country in an effort to reach children who are on the move.

Here in Pakistan, home to almost all of the world’s polio cases just a few years ago, these moving targets require a vaccination strategy as agile and stubborn as the virus itself. At hundreds of sites, teams of health workers verify that every child passing through receives the vaccine.

The interaction is fleeting — faster than getting a meal at a drive-through restaurant — but the benefit is permanent. Another child, another family, another generation is protected, and Pakistan moves one step closer to having zero polio cases.”

Read the full article on Rotary.org by clicking here.


Coffee with a Rotarian: Brian and Roger

Getting to know our fellow members and Rotarians is an important part of Rotary. Our club runs a regular initiative called “Coffee with a Rotarian,” where members are paired with other Rotarians to get to know each other in a 1 on 1 coffee session either in-person or virtually. These Coffee with a Rotarian initiatives are spearheaded by member Tzviatko Chiderov.

This week we feature a coffee session between members Brian Liddicoat in Santa Cruz, California and Roger Plested in Kamloops, Canada!

Here’s what Brian had to say about Roger:

Roger and I had a terrific online meeting: We’re both lawyers and fathers except he has about 20 years experience so I was very eager for his guidance on dealing with teenagers. Plus he lives in Kamloops, BC which is a bit of “holy site” for railroad fans like me. We really hit it off.”

Thanks for sharing, Brian! We’ll look forward to hearing from Roger about you in the future!

Members, have you participated in a Coffee with a Rotarian session lately? Make sure to get your video recaps to Tzviatko!


For Members Only: Updates

This segment of the meeting is dedicated to our club members. This section includes announcements and new initiatives. Guests, you are welcome to read this section or just skip it.

August 6th Fundraiser – Help Sell Tickets!

We need all club members to help us with our 1st annual club fundraiser happening August 6 in Livermore, CA! Please help us sell tickets, collect donations, etc! 🙂 The link to the fundraiser tickets is here: https://rotaryeclubofsiliconvalley.ticketspice.com/a-taste-of-good-with-rotary

Rotary International President-Elect Sam has died

Friends, it is with much sadness that we must inform you that Rotary International President-elect Sam Owori died last week after complications with a planned leg surgery. Here is the full statement from Rotary International: https://www.rotary.org/en/president-elect-sam-owori-dies

Past Member Announcements:

  • Club Fundraiser on August 6 “A Taste of Good with Rotary” in Livermore, CA: Looking for help, donations, gift prizes, etc! Email Andrew Taw
  • Message from Treasurer-elect Heather on Automatic Dues: Make sure to check your emails! We are switching our system over to automatic dues rather than manual payment. Treasurer-elect Heather has more info for you!
  • TRF Challenge coins: Members who donate the following amounts will receive the following coins: $1000 – Gold, $500 – Silver, $200 – Bronze. Go ahead and request your Challenge Coin via the online form here then! 
  • Service Blotter Submissions: Click here to fill out The Rotary eClub of Silicon Valley Service Survey

Our Events & Projects

We hold our meetings online, but we hold regular service projects and social events in the Silicon Valley every month! This section is updated every week with our upcoming events. We welcome guests to all of our events and service projects listed here.

Also be sure to join our Meetup Group for automatic calendar updates and to RSVP for our events! These are open to all guests as well!

Rotary E-Club of Silicon Valley

Fremont, CA
134 Members & Guests

Calling all service-minded entrepreneurs, foodies, and community leaders! This group is for anyone interested in innovation, community service, education, business networking,…

Check out this Meetup Group →

Upcoming Events:

All times are Pacific Time! (San Francisco time)

More events coming soon! All events are open to guests, unless otherwise mentioned. Feel free to join us! If you ever have questions, please email [email protected]

Special: Club Charity Fundraiser “A Taste of Good with Rotary” – Sunday, August 6, 2017 at Retzlaff Vineyard in Livermore, California

Save the date for Sunday, August 6, 2017 for our club’s first annual charity fundraiser! This delicious food and wine lunch event will indulge your taste buds while we enjoy amazing company, live music, silent auctions, auctions, and ticket drawings.

You can purchase your tickets here or share this link with your friends and colleagues: https://rotaryeclubofsiliconvalley.ticketspice.com/a-taste-of-good-with-rotary

Our club’s event chair: Andrew Taw


Happy Dollars: Do Good by Sharing Something Good

Each week we ask our members to share stories with the club and toss in a few dollars to support our efforts. The primary goal of this section is to provide a fun way of getting to know each fellow members and guests, while giving back to a good cause.

Happy dollars is an opportunity to share something positive that has happened in your life whether it is personal or business. Think of it as your opportunity to brag a little, but also put a little bit into a karma jar. The money donated through happy dollars is put to charitable use, and the message that you leave for happy dollars will be posted in our online meeting the following week for the entire week for folks to see! (Pending that it’s appropriate!)

Last week’s happy dollars went towards powering our club’s projects and service grants.

Thank you to member Brian Liddicoat for his $15 donation! Brian had this to say:
“two weeks to Twin Peaks Fest in Snoqualmie, Washington. Gettin’ excited.”

Thank you to member Rory Olsen for his generous $25 donation! Rory had this to say:
Summertime and the livin’ is easy.

Thank you to guest David Postic for his generous $5 donation! David had this to say:
Happy to attend my first Rotary e-Club meeting!

Thank you to member Monique Ziesenhenne for her generous $20 donation to The Rotary Foundation’s Annual Fund! Monique had this to say:
Annual Fund donation because I’m happy to say I’ve scheduled my dissertation defense!

Thank you all for your donations last week!

This week’s happy dollars donations will be going to help fund our club projects and service grants!

Happy dollars is also a great opportunity to share with the group about something good that has happened to you, while giving back to a great cause.

So what are you happy about? Share with us below, and help support one of our future leaders!

Fill out my online form.

Selected Six

Every week at the bottom of our meetings, there is a comments section for members and guests to tell us what they enjoyed about the meeting or to ask questions to the speaker. We select six comments every week from last week’s meeting to be featured during this week’s meeting.

Here are six comments selected from last week’s meeting about The Impact of RYLA:

Member Raquel D. Juncal (Mexico) had this to say:
“Marilyn, thanks for sharing your experience with us! My journey in Rotary started with a RYLA and I can say that it is certainly one of the best memories I have. Is a unique experience that creates an atmosphere for people to be their true selves. It’s amazing to see the transformation people go through in a very short time and one of the most exciting parts about the program is meeting all participants and seeing their visions of how they are going to make a positive impact on the world. Definitely one should go to a RYLA without expectations and ready to be surprised 😉

Member Maxi Bustos (California, USA) had this to say:
“Thanks Marilyn for sharing your RYLA experience, and my best wishes for your year as an Interact club president. I am happy to hear that our club supports youth programs like Interact and RYLA, I strongly believe those programs make a great impact on young students.

Member Catherine A. (California, USA) had this to say:
“Shout out to Rushton: I enjoyed your charming, “Coffee with a Rotarian” introduction of Shags. (No wonder everyone looks so loosey-goosey and animated in that SV eClub Paella photo.) 😉 Marilyn, I really resonated with your comments about being nervous at group events, plus your “Control Freak” confession. (What a brave woman you are!) If you can bear with me, I will share some of what I have learned, below. When I was your age I was so concerned about what everyone thought of me, it was hard to relax and be myself. I had a constant stomach ache in high school! I was very shy and raised with a steady stream of harsh expectations. A high school counselor realized my situation and my suffering, and challenged me to “go to the store and buy just one grape,” to help me get over my worry about people-pleasing and constantly seeing myself through other’s eyes, what she called, “always comparing your insides to their outsides.” I’ll never forget being 16 and taking one grape (in a plastic produce bag) to the check-out counter at my local Safeway. The checker had a good laugh and so did I, surprisingly! That day I finally crossed the Rubicon, with no going back to my old, shy ways. That painful step gave me the confidence I needed to start being more uniquely myself in other social situations. This is what I learned (take what you like and leave the rest): 1. Share your imperfections with “safe” folks. You will feel more relaxed, safer and ultimately, become a better leader, since others will see that they may also relax, be honest and be themselves around you. (People often thought I didn’t like them when I was a teen, since I was so quiet and serious, socially. Later I learned that they were all just as scared as I was!) 2. People give their best efforts when they feel heard and appreciated for their input, when they may share in all decision-making, and when they collaborate in an atmosphere which is free of harsh judgment and criticism. (Sometimes when I was too hard on myself, I was also being too hard on others.)  3. Trust your values and what you know to be true. Avoid complaining, explaining or trying to convince others to agree with you, all of which will sap your energy and give others your power. 4. Treat yourself like you would treat your best friend or your most beloved relative. Make no exceptions to that rule. 5. Learn to laugh about your honest mistakes. We all make them and they are the best gift! Nothing has given me more useful data and life-information, than correcting my honest mistakes. (See #4. The kinder and more accepting you can be towards yourself and learn to love your unique quirks, the kinder you will be towards others and their unique quirks. Note to self: This does NOT apply to abusive or bullying people or situations. Trust your gut feelings regarding safety. If you don’t feel safe or if someone makes you feel confused or bad about yourself, leave the situation immediately and find a safe adult to help you.) 6. Balance play time with work (and worry) time. Set a timer for worrying. Ding! Stop and do something you enjoy, since you have spent your worry time for that day.  7. Learn to interpret being nervous as being energized and excited in a new situation. Proceed with no expectations that you will do your project or socialize perfectly, yet will fully ENJOY doing your best with others in the room. (It’s all in how you interpret that blast of energy in a new situation, plus how you modify your inner self-talk. 😉 8. Be here now. Focus on your breathing. Notice the colors, the smells, the expressions and the movements of others, the sounds of voices, of nature and of what you feel with the tips of your fingers on your clothes, your feet in your shoes, etc. Tap your leg to bring your focus back to yourself and your breath, when you start to fret or worry. Fully engage yourself in each of your senses, as life flows by like a river around you. Don’t attach to what is flowing by; just enjoy the parade of life on this one day, in this one moment, as the gift of life given to you today.
9. No matter how old we are, every year is new and fresh, and we have never been the age we are today, before. Every year we learn more about ourselves and about life.  10. Be gentle with yourself on your journey. –Catherine A.”

Member Mark Dohn (Michigan, USA) had this to say:
“Thank you Marilyn for sharing your experience and growth while attending RYLA! I’m impressed with what you were able to take away from only five days and hope your growth as a leader continues.

Member Nathan Gildart (Tokyo, Japan) had this to say:
Marilyn, your honesty is impressive. Thinking about yourself as a leader and collaborator reflectively seems to have really sunk in. Self-reflection and being honest with yourself, not to mention stepping out of your comfort zone, will empower you to grow not only as a leader, but in many other ways. By the time you finish high school you will be flying! (I got the attached image from a Twitter friend, and I think it can represent young people such as Marilyn. Find your cape!) The video on the world through the eye of a Muslim is a poignant reminder of the road ahead to open minds. Nice choice. Great to learn more about RYLA from those with experience!

Member Rushton Hurley (California, USA) had this to say:
“Marilyn and Yvonne, it was good to get more detail about RYLA. When we think of our club’s special focuses (innovation, education, and entrepreneurship), I think leadership programs for young people fits in nicely. The Rotary Club of Santa Clara is one of several in our district that supports a program to help students who are identified in their schools as showing promise (but perhaps not getting impressive grades) begin to see possibilities in moving cool ideas forward for starting businesses. Rotary makes great things happen! Greetings to everyone from Switzerland, by the way! Yesterday we arrived and got a walk around the little town where our cousins live. Walking helped keep me from falling over asleep as a result of jet lag. Another thanks to friends taking care of our house and cat while we’re gone!”

Be sure to leave a comment at the end of this week’s meeting after you watch the program below, and perhaps you’ll see your comment featured next week!


Program: The Health Benefits of Cannabis Extracts

Every week we bring to you a new program on innovation, education, technology, and humanitarian service. This week our guest is Laurie Light, Client Care Program Director for Octavia Wellness.

Laurie Light is the Client Care Program Director for Octavia Wellness, a San Francisco based cannabis sales and consulting company. Prior to Octavia, Laurie worked for a non-profit organization teaching elementary school-aged children healthy lifestyle and resiliency skills. Lesson topics also included drugs vs. medicine, alcohol, marijuana and bullying.

Laurie became interested in medical cannabis when her mother was diagnosed with a terminal blood cancer in 2015. Laurie received her industry training at Oaksterdam University and passed a 13-course Medical Cannabis for Nurses curriculum via the American Cannabis Nurse Association. Though she is not a medical provider, she is a knowledgeable cannabis educator and works with cannabis trained medical professionals to help adults and seniors in the responsible use of medical cannabis.

Please join us in welcoming Laurie!

Related Links

  • Octavia Wellness

Leave a comment!

Feel free to ask Laurie a question in the comments!


Upcoming Program Schedule

All of our guest speakers and programs are recorded live online. We welcome members and guests to join us in one of these upcoming recordings. Recordings are approximately 45 minutes long and are subject to change without notice.

Upcoming Recordings:

  • None at the moment!

If you would like to join us for any of the live recordings, please email [email protected] with your request. Requests will be checked up until 5 minutes prior to the recording time. Please note the timezone is all California, USA time.


You’re Almost Done! One last thing: The Attendance Survey…

Thanks for reading and watching this week’s meeting. You have two last things to do before you’re done. First, we have a very short attendance survey below for you to fill out to record your attendance.

Visiting Rotarians, this is how you can get an email receipt to pass along to your club’s secretary as proof that you’ve attended our meeting if you need it for makeups.

Non-Rotarian Guests, we would love to see who is dropping by our meetings! This part is optional for you. If you think you may want to join our eClub at some point in the future, we would strongly recommend you fill out the attendance form as it will improve your chances of success for your membership application.

More importantly, for all members and guests — we strongly recommend and ask that you leave a comment below in our comments area below. Tell us how you enjoyed the program. Ask this week’s speaker any questions you might have. Or just stop by and say hello and tell us where you’re from!

Fill out my online form.
  • Catherine A

    The following is a selection of scientific, research-based marijuana information from the National Institutes for Health, The Journal of the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Neurology, the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, the American Cancer Society and the Organization of Tetrology Information Specialists.

    Please review and consider all aspects of the scientific material below, then draw your own conclusions.

    If you or someone you know needs medical advice, seek a licensed, board certified graduate of an accredited medical school (MD) or a licensed nurse with a degree from an accredited 4-year nursing school (RN):
    http://www.abms.org/board-certification/
    https://www.ncsbn.org/contact-bon.htm

    Marijuana: the allergen you never knew existed – American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology:
    http://acaai.org/news/marijuana-allergen-you-never-knew-existed

    Impaired brain function & increased depression, agitation and anxiety in regular marijuana users – NIH:
    https://www.drugabuse.gov/news-events/news-releases/2014/07/regular-marijuana-users-may-have-impaired-brain-reward-centers

    Driving after marijuana use surpasses drunk driving – NIH:
    https://www.drugabuse.gov/news-events/nida-notes/2014/07/among-high-school-seniors-driving-after-marijuana-use-surpasses-drunk-driving

    Evidence for and against marijuana use in Neurological Disorders – AAN:
    https://www.aan.com/Guidelines/Home/GetGuidelineContent/650

    Cannabis Use and Risk for Substance Use Disorders and Mood or Anxiety Disorders – JAMA:
    http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2610319

    Marijuana and Pregnancy – OTIS:
    http://mothertobaby.org/fact-sheets/marijuana-pregnancy/pdf/

    The Science of the Endocannabinoid System: How THC Affects the Brain and the Body – NIH, NIDA & USDHHS:
    http://headsup.scholastic.com/students/endocannabinoid

    Marijuana and Cancer – American Cancer Association:
    https://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/complementary-and-alternative-medicine/marijuana-and-cancer.html

    • ShagsCA

      All good studies. Please know that most of what Laurie and I were talking about are high-concentrate CBD or THC-A extracts that are non-psychoactive, which means that they don’t produce a “high”. The MD schools don’t yet teach about the body’s natural endocannabinoid system because they don’t understand it. We don’t recommend that seniors seeking pain and other relief through medical cannabis “smoke buds” where the dosage is unknown. Micro-dosing through tinctures and specifically-formulated vaporizing pens is recommended to find the optimal personal level and entourage effect of the CBD/THC-A combination.

  • Shags and Laurie, thank you for the presentation. It’s good to hear about the potential of these substances, and I hope further research allows a clearer and clearer understanding of under what circumstances they are most helpful. I also want to compliment Catherine A on the ten pieces of life advice – great stuff!

  • Carey Lai

    Laurie, Thank you for your detailed presentation.

  • Rory Olsen

    Laurie,

    Thank you for giving your presentation to our club.

    As a student of Rhetoric, I feel compelled to point out that your presentation was very one sided. You extolled the benefits of cannabis, but failed to list the costs. As a lawyer and as a judge dealing with civil mental health commitments for over three decades, I have seen many, many instances of people harming themselves with self medication.

    In the interests of fairness, may I suggest a program in which a board certified psychiatrist discusses the psychiatric pluses and minuses of cannabis treatment. That would provide our members with a more balanced view of the subject.

    • ShagsCA

      As with my reply below to Catherine, most of what Laurie and I were talking about are high-concentrate CBD
      or THC-A extracts that are non-psychoactive, which means that they don’t
      produce a “high”. This is not “smoking pot” — it’s micro-dosing of essential compounds extracted from the plant that are not hallucinogenic.

  • Keith Marsh

    Laurie, this was a very informative program. Thanks for presenting.

  • Leanza Tupfer

    Laurie, thank you for presenting Octavia Wellness to our club! Your presentation and discussion of cannabis can cause quite a bit of controversy as there is still lots of concern over using/taking cannabis for medical concern, as in the past, cannabis use was seen as recreational and controversial (still to this day). I appreciate that Octavia Wellness educates others on the health benefits of cannabis use and that there are tailored consulting sessions to help seniors and those who need it find a cannabis solution safely. Of course to other Rotarians’ point (especially Rory’s), a full exploration of both the potential benefits and risk of cannabis use must always be discussed, especially for a topic so controversial and for potential medical use.

  • Laurie, enjoyed your presentation. Informative. Love the video about the MacGuyver who jury rigged a motor bike from his broken vehicle. Necessity is the mother of invention.

  • Monique le Conge Ziesenhenne

    Thanks very much for the presentation and the information – worth considering for many people. I do know folks who have had some form of extract prescribed by a physician for different reasons (anxiety, stroke rehab, extreme pain) and all have found it beneficial. In at least 2 cases, both folks would have preferred not to use the extracts but were relieved with their experiences. Loved the motor bike! Nice.

  • Raquel D. Juncal

    Scientific data confirm that the use of cannabis and its derivatives should be treated as a therapeutic alternative beyond the bias associated with the recreational consumption of this substance. Therefore, the final decision for its application in a particular patient should depend exclusively on the same medical criteria that govern the administration of any other drug, ie the relationship between risk and benefit for each patient.

    Laurie, very informative program! Thanks for your presentation!

  • Nathan Gildart

    Laurie, that was a really informative presentation. In Canada we’ve had this discussion for as long as I can remember and I think there is a lot of validity in the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes.

    Great vid on the French Innovator! Way cool indeed. If I was stranded in a desert I’d most likely curl up in the fetal position and cry until someone came to my rescue! (and hopefully not fine me for loitering!!!)

  • Tzviatko Chiderov

    Thanks Laurie for the great program.

  • Nicole Pham

    Thank you Laurie and Shags for your very interesting presentation. As someone who grew up being healed by the use of herbs and natural medicine and now that I am in the medical field, I am always interested by the intersection of holistic and allopathic medicine.

  • Brett Sham

    I was so shocked and saddened to hear of the passing of President Elect Sam – he gave such a passionate and energetic acceptance speech in Atlanta.

    Laurie, thanks for such an informative presentation. Here in Australia the debate is still raging on and I believe that medicinal cannabis is only made available to those that are terminally ill with strict conditions, despite it being shown to assist many where conventional medicines have been unable to help.

    It shocks me that medicinal cannabis use, particularly given the therapies you discussed, still attracts so much debate and stigma, yet there are so many opioid derived mediations that are freely used and accepted. Thanks for shedding more light on these treatments and explaining how medicinal cannabis is so different and so much more than allowing people to smoke marijuana.

  • Angela Hoang

    Thanks for a really fascinating talk Laurie and Shags. I think the most important thing to remember is that when patients have chronic disease states like pain or insomnia that we as healthcare professionals help to arm them with information about different management options with pros and cons for our patients so it helps them decide which ones they may wish to try. Sometimes patients do present with alternative therapies and I know from my own experience that the ideal scenario would be that they do talk to their healthcare professionals so everyone is on the same page and our patients can be monitored along the treatment plans. Hopefully by engaging with their Doctors, nurse practitioners and educators, those using medicinal cannabis would be able to optimise their healthcare (which from your examples they do seem to be) and this is a promising step forward!

  • mahmood khan

    Thanks Laurie for your informative presentation. Interesting that it has so many benefits. I had no idea.
    cheers

  • Richard Knaggs

    Cool Bike, I would love to be able to make something like that. Thanks Laurie, this is such a contentious issue in many places in the world. I believe all herbs have medicinal properties and it makes sense that certain molecules in Cannabis would be beneficial.

  • Hello everyone,
    I was checking about Polio and we need see another situation, but with adults right now, because we have been cases at Brazil, Brazil started on 1985 with vaccines and Brazilian doctors found a different situation, I mean, Post-Polio.

    “Post-polio syndrome refers to a cluster of potentially disabling signs and symptoms that appear decades — an average of 30 to 40 years — after the initial polio illness.
    Polio once resulted in paralysis and death. However, the inactivated polio vaccine greatly reduced polio’s spread.
    Today, few people in developed countries get paralytic polio, thanks to the vaccine, introduced in 1955. However, people who had polio at a young age might get post-polio syndrome.” —- https://goo.gl/UF7caa

    Laurie and Shags congrats, you made a great apresentation about this, we had a case with Brazilian Family, their daughter need cannabis treatment, but here it was illegal, so this family found in USA with expensive price, the solution for their daughter was produce it, ”I found it dangerous, when I read about” https://goo.gl/JC5HzY (Portuguese Text) ….. So, this year it was approved here, I found a link: https://goo.gl/GvhYjJ

  • Ferheen Abbasi

    Thank you for your presentation, Laurie! Super informative and important for everyone to listen to!

  • john lozano

    Laurie, thank you for your presentation. I attended college in Humboldt county (late 1980’s) where the use of cannabis has been debated for many years. It is interesting hearing the topic becoming more mainstream and accepted as an alternative for traditional Western medicine.

  • Thanks Shags for introducing us to Laurie. As a Chiropractor, I have seen many people respond to this form of therapy People are turning away from opioid use and looking for alternatives for pain relief. This is a great option

    • ShagsCA

      Thanks for the testimonial, Heather!

  • Maxi Bustos

    Very interesting program, thanks Laurie for your presentation!

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Copyright Rotary eClub of Silicon Valley 2015-2017, located in Rotary District 5170 in the sunny Silicon Valley of California, USA. Rotary International club #86428. Inquiries can be sent to [email protected]

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